Now that the politicians on both sides of the aisle have decided to take a bit more of the private economy in taxes and keep piling up debts for future generations, it is time for markets to return to normal seasonality and resume weighing up the prospects for different investment classes without constant reference to the hot political winds gusting out of Washington.

The question most investors should be contemplating is whether we will see a repeat of last year when the equity markets extended the “January Effect” through the entire first quarter of the year.

The FundLogik application indicates that now is the time allocate a larger portion of your assets towards the “risk” end of the spectrum. Whether that momentum peters our in February or steams on until the beginning of April remains to be seen.

In the 6 ETF FundLogik Portfolio, Non-US large cap equities (represented by EFA) and the Emerging Market Equities (represented by EEM) are ahead of SPY, TLT and DBC with QQQ bringing up the rear. However, if the January Effect does stretch further into the first quarter, it would be logical to expect QQQ to move up smartly in the rankings.

In the sample bond portfolio, Convertibles and Emerging Market debt funds are leading the pack. This suggests an appetite for more risk and a reach for yield.

In the sample equity portfolio, European Equities ranks at the top while Emerging Markets replaces Developed Markets, largely mirroring the FundLogik Portfolio ranking.

In the Blended ETF Portfolio, China (FXI) and International Real Estate (RWX) come out at the top of the list. China was volatile for most of last year but picked up steam after the leadership transition was completed. Real Estate is both a yield play and a capital gains play.

Political Risks will resurface

There are still a few more “political crises” to come, all of them just as manufactured as the one that was “narrowly averted” in the wee hours of the New Year. Whatever one’s political leanings, most can agree that the resolutions are of the “kick the can down the road” variety. Despite the promises to do better next time, the bottom line is that the new political line up in Washington looks the same as the old line up. There is little reason to expect a different outcome next time.

So, what does this mean for investors?

“January effect” should be fairly well pronounced this year. A combination of tax loss harvesting from a volatile 2012, the rehashing of the Euro crisis, leadership change in China and the political drama in the US means that institutions entered 2013 with a bias towards safe assets. Don’t be surprised to see money flowing back into QQQ and SPY favorites as fund managers rebalance for first quarter optimism.

Last year, the “risk off” trade was US Treasuries, the US dollar and, at times, precious metals. But these asset classes have rallied hard in recent years. It is hard to see how there is much upside left in these assets, particularly US Treasuries. The conditions which support the high prices will persist: a still massive US current account deficit, FED purchases of Treasuries and the fact that many other major currencies, particularly the Euro, don’t look very promising relative to the US dollar. Since none of those conditions appear ripe for change in the near term, one can expect continued fund flows towards two of the largest asset classes. There will continue to be “worry pieces” in the financial media about China, Japan or Middle East sovereign wealth funds looking to “dump” their Treasuries. The outcome will be no different; these large holders can shift at the margin but cannot dump. US dollars flowing out through the Current Account will flow back into US Treasuries and other similarly overpriced assets for the foreseeable future.

That does not mean there will be no volatility. Given the fact that both the household and government sectors are still massively in debt, even small shock events will continue to be magnified by the excessive leverage that remains in the system.

The real question is that of rebalancing. Will institutions remain happy to add to their piles of low yielding US Treasuries and cash as well as their non-yielding hoards of Gold? Or will we see more shifting towards riskier assets? At the margin, it is not the foreign sovereign wealth fund that drives the asset allocation but the large US institutions. If a consensus forms that equities and real estate assets are a better value than US Treasuries (ie. not just lip service but actual shifts in asset allocations), then we could see a rise in interest rates combined with a strong surge of liquidity into the stock and property markets. The stock markets will react positively while the US real estate market would probably just accelerate the digestion of the inventory hangover of the last 5 years.

At this point it is hard to say which way the balance will swing. Low growth in the G-8 economies could give comfort to asset allocators that the lofty values at the long end of the Treasury market will be supported by the FED’s commitment to “twisting” the yield curve. A change to the delicate balance however could send investors scrambling. The bloated FED balance sheet plus Bernanke’s commitment to keep interest rates low for as long as possible may not be enough to stem the rush for the exits.

For now, the FundLogik application is pointing towards a healthy “January Effect”. Position yourself accordingly.


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