Continuing on from last week’s topic, we look East for signs of a stronger or weaker January effect for riskier assets.

Washington Beltway antics have not gone away (eg. the new Treasury Secretary’s loopy signature). But we think investors should focus on the Global Economy, where companies big, medium and small struggle for sales and profits.

One interesting corner of the Global Economy is China. While there are over 100 ETFs with China exposure (courtesy of ETFdb.com), by screening out sub-$100m funds, one can limit oneself to just 6 ETFs for consideration. FXI is by far the largest (with similarly profiled GXC and MCHI taking #2 and #3 slots) while HAO, PGJ and CHIQ offer exposure to different and smaller segments of the Chinese economy.

What is interesting about the structure of the equities available in China is that they primarily offer exposure to the domestic economy. Exports may have been the important driver of the “China Miracle” but for fund managers and regular investors alike it has always been hard to pick up meaningful direct exposure.

Therefore, when looking at China going forward, it is important to look at indicators for the domestic economy. Two reliable indicators are the imported Iron Ore Price and Electricity Production.

Electricity

China's Electricity Production - Monthly
Source: Bloomberg

Electricity Production is a well-followed index because it has proven to be a very clean and useful data set over the years. While GDP numbers and CPI figures have drawn sideways glances from time to time, the jumpy electricity figures (note the regular Chinese New Year drop every year in Jan-Feb) are not considered politically sensitive. What the figures show this year is pretty consistent growth at around the 9%-10% level.

Iron Ore

Imported Iron Ore - Monthly
Source: Bloomberg

The other price to watch is the Iron Ore import price. China imports bulk iron ore from Australia, Brazil and other countries to feed the domestic and export production machines. From September 2011 to September 2012, the price of sea-borne Iron Ore almost halved as the Chinese economy softened. Part of that was due to the petering out of stimulus programs launched in 2008 and 2009 but the leadership change of 2012 also played a part in the overall bearishness.

Without much fanfare, the price has rebounded sharply, first to the 120 level and now into the 150’s. While most Australia exporters are still keeping $120 in their cashflow projections for the year, it is clear that Chinese demand for Iron Ore has returned.

Conclusion – Cautiously Optimistic

The Chinese Economy looks like it is stabilizing at high single digit growth rates. It is clearly not following the path of fellow BRIC members Russia and Brazil which have experienced sharp deceleration in growth rates over the last few years. The China ETFs are exposed primarily to the domestic market which our two indices above suggest will see some strength. But remember that most of the component stocks in the S&P 500 (SPY), EAFE (EFA) and the DAX (EWG) also have big stakes in China’s economic fortunes. With low expectations for the G8 economies, the global multinationals are looking at the massive middle class spending power forming in China and India to drive growth in the medium term.

FXI ranks well in our Balanced ETF Portfolio, which is the default portfolio in slot #7. It also comes out on top of our large ETF rankings.


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